CBD Treatment

CBD Treatment

CBD (more formally known as cannabidiol) is a non-intoxicating component of the hemp or cannabis plant. CBD works in the body’s own endocannabinoid system and regulates a wide range of biochemical actions.

CBD Therapy at Wholeness Health

CBD (more formally known as cannabidiol) is a non-intoxicating component of the hemp or cannabis plant. CBD works in the body’s own endocannabinoid system and regulates a wide range of biochemical actions. In the last five years we have witnessed explosive growth in CBD research and also wide spread public interest. The anti-inflammatory effect is well documented and it also appears to help modulate pain control pathways.

CBD can be sourced from either hemp or cannabis. The main difference is that hemp is regulated to contain only trace amounts of THC (the intoxicating ingredient). THC generally can make people more anxious or paranoid in addition to a range of other effects. CBD, on the other hand, has a calming effect on the central nervous system and can actually treat seizures. In reviewing the effects on the central nervous system, CBD and THC have nearly opposite (and in many ways complementary) effects. At Wholeness, we only prescribe hemp derived CBD to reduce any concerns about intoxication or impairment.

The practitioners at Wholeness have been extremely impressed with the value of CBD in treating psychiatric disorders. Over the last five years we have published four (soon to be five) peer reviewed studies involving CBD in mental health. These studies are available for you to review on the link below. These studies show that CBD reduces anxiety in our patients and helps with the treatment of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and emotional trauma. We have also found that CBD can reduce social anxiety and support the treatment of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It may also be beneficial in treating psychosis or thought disorder.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Does CBD help with depression? We have not found CBD to be helpful in treating depression, unless it is an anxious depression.
  • Can CBD show up on a drug screen? Yes, we have found that some sensitive drug screens will test positive when someone is taking CBD. The trace amounts of THC, while not intoxicating may convert a drug test.
  • Does CBD interact with psychiatric medications? Although there is a hypothetical interaction with some psychiatric medications, the effect is so small that it has not been a problem in our experience
  • How long does it take for CBD to work? We generally see effects within a week or two. It appears to act quickly.
  • Are your research results definitive? No, they are preliminary and need to be followed by larger controlled studies. We saw a massive need for more clinical information and decided to publish our extensive experience in treating patients.
  • Does it matter where I get my CBD? Yes, we feel that it is important to know that your CBD has been tested for purity and quantity. Make sure the manufacturer documents this data.
  • Do you recommend that I take CBD for my psychiatric problems? No, if you think you may benefit from CBD, it will make sense for you to be evaluated by a mental health professional.
  • What are the side effects from CBD? We have found CBD side effects to be mild and well tolerated. Some will experience fatigue or tiredness, but in our experience well under 5% of people taking CBD notice that.